Naomi Roe Photography
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Egypt

Marsa Shagra, Marsa Alam, Egypt. 

Great/Giant Barracuda - Sphyraena barracuda

Great/Giant Barracuda - Sphyraena barracuda

This species is found in subtropical oceans around the world and often grows to over 6 feet (1.8 m) long and is a type of ray-finned fish. I came across this solitary fish at the house reef in Marsa Shagra, Marsa Alam, Egypt.

Bluespotted Ribbontail Ray - Taeniura lymma

Bluespotted Ribbontail Ray - Taeniura lymma

Photographed during a night dive on the house reef at Marsa Shagra in Marsa Alam, Egypt.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has assessed the bluespotted ribbontail ray as Near Threatened. Although still relatively common and widely distributed, this species faces continuing degradation of its coral reef habitat throughout its range, from development and destructive fishing practices using cyanide or dynamite. In addition, its populations are under heavy pressure by artisanal and commercial fisheries, and by local collecting for the aquarium trade.

Bluespotted Ribbontail Ray - Taeniura lymma

Bluespotted Ribbontail Ray - Taeniura lymma

Sleeping Parrotfish

Sleeping Parrotfish

"Traditionally, the parrotfishes have been considered a family level taxon, Scaridae. Although phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis of parrotfishes is ongoing, they are now accepted to be a clade in the tribe Cheilini, and are now commonly referred to as scarine labrids (subfamily Scarinae, family Labridae)."

Red Sea Clownfish - Amphiprion bicinctus

Red Sea Clownfish - Amphiprion bicinctus

Photographed at Gabel El Rosas (Nemo City), Marsa Alam, Egypt.

Clownfish form symbiotic mutualisms with sea anemones and are unaffected by the stinging tentacles of the host anemone. The sea anemone protects the clownfish from predators, as well as providing food through the scraps left from the anemone's meals and occasional dead anemone tentacles. In return, the clownfish defends the anemone from its predators, and parasites.

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Spot-fin Porcupinefish - Diodon hystrix

Spot-fin Porcupinefish - Diodon hystrix

In case of danger, the porcupinefish can inflate itself by swallowing water to deter the potential predator with its larger volume and it can raise its spines.

The porcupinefish concentrates a poison, called tetrodotoxin, in certain parts of its body such as the liver, skin, gonads and the viscera. Tetrodotoxin is a powerful neurotoxin. This defensive system constitutes an additional device to dissuade the potential predators.

Coral Arch

Coral Arch

House Reef, Marsa Shagra, Marsa Alam, Egypt.

Klunzinger's Feather Star - Lamprometra klunzingeri

Klunzinger's Feather Star - Lamprometra klunzingeri

Klunzinger's feather star fall under the following taxonomical hierarchy; Animalia - Echinodermata - Crinoidea - Comatulida - Mariamtridae - Lamprometra.

Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). Crinoidea comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live both in shallow water and in depths as great as 6,000 metres (20,000 ft). Sea lilies refer to the crinoids which, in their adult form, are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk. Feather stars or comatulids refer to the unstalked forms.

They are often found on fire corals, gorgonias and sponges. 

Giant Moray - Gymnothorax javanicus

Giant Moray - Gymnothorax javanicus

In terms of body mass, it is the largest moray eel. The giant moray is carnivorous, it leaves its lair at night to actively hunt its prey along the reef. It mainly feeds on fish and occasionally on crustaceans. It is known to engage in cooperative hunting with the roving coralgrouper (Plectropomus pessuliferus).

This particular eel was rather inquisitive of my camera, particularly the strobes.

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Blue-cheeked Butterflyfish - Chaetodon semilarvatus

Blue-cheeked Butterflyfish - Chaetodon semilarvatus

They are found in the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden, at depths of between 3 and 20 m. This species is one of the few fish species to have long-term mates. In the wild, the fish eats hard corals as well as benthic invertebrates.

Common Lionfish - Pterois miles

Common Lionfish - Pterois miles

Also known as the devil firefish, is a species of ray-finned fish native to the western Indo-Pacific region. The common lionfish is frequently confused with its close relative, the red lionfish (Pterois volitans). The scientific name is from Greek pteron, meaning "wing," and Latin miles, meaning "soldier."

Freckled Hawkfish - Paracirrhites forsteri

Freckled Hawkfish - Paracirrhites forsteri

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